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FROM Nepali Times, ISSUE #434 (16 JAN 2009 – 22 JAN 2009) It was only in death that one got to know what a fine journalist Nepal had lost in Uma Singh. Working in the most lawless part of Nepal, Uma Singh was fearless with her written and spoken word. She reported in particular against
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From The Hindu (April 17, 2006) ALL OVER the subcontinent, every day, the most disadvantaged fall through the cracks. They are pummelled by the forces of state, market or feudalism. For the middle class, the political parties, or those linked to the state there is recourse although it may not be always available or efficiently
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From Counterpunch (March 31, 2005) Struggling for Nepal’s Future King Gyanendra has taken the people of Nepal on a disastrous course, using the excuse of fighting an insurgency to compromise democracy. Nepali society must be returned to complete democratic rule, which also provides the only means to tackle the raging rebellion and promote social and
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From The Hindu (Feb 03, 2005) WHEN KING Gyanendra of Nepal sacked the Prime Minister, Sher Bahadur Deuba, and began direct rule on February 1, 2005, he said he did so under a constitutional provision that enjoins the monarchy to uphold and protect the Constitution. While he repeated many times his commitment to constitutional monarchy
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Whether to absolve Dipendra or to indict him posthumously, it was important that everyone (conspiratorialist, rationalist, or royalist) who cared for the country demand that parliament hold hearings on the royal massacre.

From Outlook India (April 17, 2000) Just as Kargil was India’s first television war, the taking of Indian Airlines flight IC 814 was the first hijack drama of the satellite age, and the channels exploited it to the hilt. And even as the plane circled over Amritsar in the very first leg of the extended
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From Himal (July 1998) At the age of 16, Diwan Singh Bohra was forced to leave his village of Karan Karayal in Pithoragarh District of Uttar Pradesh. His father, Badri Singh, had only 10 bigah of degraded hilly land, which did not produce enough to support a family of six children. So, Diwan Singh went
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From Himal (January 1989) We would like our readers to know that Himal is not just an environmental magazine. To clarify, Himal is a magazine on social, economic, cultural and environmental matters which affeel and afflict the people of the Himalaya. Treating this magazine only as an environmental advocacy bulletin restricts its reach and does
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From Himal (November, 1988) Like mountain people elsewhere in the world, Himalayans have limited access to information. Radio stations and newspapers from from La Paz to Calcutta beam titillating news-of-the-moment up to the hills, but there is clearly a need to supplement the voices from the plains. This is where H/MAL steps in -for the
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From Himal (July 1988) Careening on a auto-rickshaw around New and Old Delhi while researching our cover feature on migration, we discovered that you don’t need English, Hindi or Punjabi to ask directions in the Indian capital. Nepali will do. With thousands of men and boys from the Nepali hills now manning the dust-ridden street
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