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Not again

From Nepali Times, ISSUE #153 (11 JULY 2003 – 17 JULY 2003) The people need a ceasefire that guarantees human rights. Five months into the ceasefire, Nepalis are without representation, without security, and without development. Reconstruction and rehabilitation is still a mirage. But an even larger tragedy looms: an institutional loss of human rights, militarisation,
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Nepal: King and Parties

From Himal Southasia, Volume 16, Number 6 (JUN 2003) What is forgotten is that the prelude to the dozen years of undoubtedly messy multiparty democracy was three decades of autocratic rule by the palace Nepal’s political parties have over the years dug themselves into a pit of non-credibility. Their detachment from the national interest and
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Why do we need tanks?

From Nepali Times, ISSUE #145 (16 MAY 2003 – 22 MAY 2003) Nepal does not need, nor can it afford, to buy tanks and helicopter gunships. The Procurement Office of the Master General of Ordnance of the Royal Nepali Army (RNA) has sought applications from agents of international firms wishing to be included in a
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The seat of power

From Nepali Times, ISSUE #143 (02 MAY 2003 – 08 MAY 2003) A visiting Nepali dignitary clad in his national dress was once spoofed by the British press for arriving in his long johns The male attire that is the Nepali national dress came to the middle Himalaya from Rajasthan: proof for Kathmandu’s warrior-caste elite
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Spinal Injury-A tragedy among so many

From Nepali Times, ISSUE #141 (18 APRIL 2003 – 24 APRIL 2003) A rehabilitation centre in Jorpati has just completed its first year of helping people with spinal injuries, and has shown how much more needs to be done. Nepal is one of the most vertical countries in the world, and people are falling from
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From Himal Southasia, Volume 16, Number 4 (APR 2003) A CASUALTY of the war on Iraq by George W Bush has been the image of the American press as the exemplar of journalistic accomplishment. For decades, journalists worldwide, and in the developing world in particular, looked up to their American colleagues with awe (that word!)
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Candid talk in Delhi

From Nepali Times, ISSUE #133 (21 FEB 2003 – 27 FEB 2003) A seminar yields clues on Indian thinking on security issues as they relate to insurgent-ridden Nepal. When Indians and Nepalis meet to talk bilateral relations, the discussants invariably take refuge behind their respective national flags and there is little introspection or self-criticism. Among
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Mr Bangdel has left the country

From Nepali Times, ISSUE #117 (01 NOV 2002 – 07 NOV 2002) “When the devotees and people of the country are deprived of their gods and goddesses, their hearts bleed. The stealing of such religious images is an atrocity, a serious crime… Let us hope that some day these stolen sculptures will be returned to
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Fighting by the rules

From Nepali Times, ISSUE #110 (06 SEPT 2002 – 12 SEPT 2002) General Pyar Jung Thapa takes over as Chief of Army Staff next week. He faces the challenge of fighting the Maoists without sullying the image of the army. The monsoon is about to end, and together with it may come a renewed bout
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Upper Mustang in Kathmandu

From Nepali Times, ISSUE #106 (09 AUG 2002 – 15 AUG 2002) An innovative stage production of a novel by Sarubhakta successfully takes on the sensitive matter of Bhotiya polyandry ThangLa was put up two weeks ago (27 July) as a one-off staging at the Royal Nepal Academy by Pokhara’s Pratibimba theatre group, directed by
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