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From HIMAL, Volume 2, Issue 4 (SEP/OCT 1989) When Himal brought out its prototype issue in May 1987, there were well-wishers who expressed worries about the magazine’s sustainability. Since the prototype issue seemed to have covered every matter worth reporting, what would we do for subsequent issues? Our standard answer was always been that the
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From HIMAL, Volume 2, Issue 3 (JUL/AUG 1989) It has been almost 15 years since Erik Eckholm’s book Losing Ground hit the stands and made many aware of the perils of Himalayan ecological degrada­tion. Since then, there have been many studies on the processes of erosion, “mass wasting”, floods, forestry policy, stall feeding, topsoil runoff,
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An Obsession with Tourism

From HIMAL, Volume 2, Issue 3 (JUL/AUG 1989) The Himalaya has taken to tourism in a big way. International visitors are swelling the high valleys from Chitral in Pakistan, eastward through Manali, Thak Khola, Khumbu, Sandakpu to Wangdiphodrang in Bhutan, They are all out to “do” Kashmir, Bhutan, Nepal or Tibet. For the foreigner, the
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From HIMAL, Volume 2, Issue 1 (JAN/FEB 1989) We would like our readers to know that Himal is not just an environmental magazine. To clarify, Himal is a magazine on social, economic, cultural and environmental matters which affeel and afflict the people of the Himalaya. Treating this magazine only as an environmental advocacy bulletin restricts
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Dharma in a Changing Landscape

From HIMAL, Volume 1, Issue 2 (NOV/DEC 1988) By Sudhindra Sharraa and Kanak Mani Dixit In the chill of the evening by the banks of the Bhagirathi River near Uttar Kashi, the stars are beginning to show as Mahant Shankar Puri raises his voice in high pitched praise of Shiva, lord of the snows. It
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From HIMAL, Volume 1, Issue 2 (NOV/DEC 1988) John K. Locke, who edits Kailash in Kathmandu, says his main problem has always been with the printers. After a local press took seven months to publish one issue, he tried printing in Varanasi, then back again in Kathmandu, and is now planning to typeset in Kathmandu
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From HIMAL, Volume 1, Issue 2 (NOV/DEC 1988) Like mountain people elsewhere in the world, Himalayans have limited access to information. Radio stations and newspapers from from La Paz to Calcutta beam titillating news-of-the-moment up to the hills, but there is clearly a need to supplement the voices from the plains. This is where HIMAL
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Highlanders on the Move

From HIMAL, Volume 1, Issue 1 (July 1988) A Quest for Survival At the age of 16, Diwan Singh Bohra was forced to leave his village of Karan Karayal in Pithoragarh District of Uttar Pradesh. His father, Badri Singh, had only 10 bigah of degraded hilly land, which did not produce enough to support a
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From HIMAL, Volume 1, Issue 1 (July 1988) Careening on a auto-rickshaw around New and Old Delhi while researching our cover feature on migration, we discovered that you don’t need English, Hindi or Punjabi to ask directions in the Indian capital. Nepali will do. With thousands of men and boys from the Nepali hills now
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Many Babies Die in Nepal

From HIMAL, Volume 0, Issue 0 (May 1987) Rabindra Thapa, 24, a community health worker associated with Save the Children (USA) is making his rounds through the communities of north Gork-ha. At the village of Archalay in Laku-ry Bot Panchayat, a five-year-old boy is clearly in the last stages of terminal pneumonia. He was breathing
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